Over the past several years I have compiled many research journals which relate to the history of the Kaihu Valley, North Ripiro West Coast and South Hokianga in Northland, New Zealand.  The period covers the arrival of the first nation people (Maori) in about 1300 AD, to the year 1900.  In some cases, this time span overlaps as details of the history require.

I have created this webpage to publish the journals for those who may be interested now, or in the future.  I have also included work I have done on local genealogies/whakapapa and military histories.  Please feel free to save anything you find useful as you flick through the vast amount of information, and if you have any questions you are welcome to contact me, either by commenting on the site or through the contact details below:

Roger Mold
rangerrodge@gmail.com

 

KO MAUNGANUI ME TUTAMOE O NGA MAUNGA
MY MOUNTAINS
KO WAIMA, ME WHATORO ME KAIHU ME WAIROA O NGA AWA
MY RIVERS
KO KAI IWI TE ROTO
MY LAKES
KO RIPIRO TE TAHUNA
MY COAST
KO WAIPOUA TE NGAHERE
MY FOREST
KO TANE MAHUTA TE ATUA
MY GOD OF THE FOREST
KO MOLD KO SNOWDEN
TE WHANAU E NOHO ANA TENA WAAHI

Research Journals

Links to the journals can be found by selecting from the menu in the top right hand side of the page, or by clicking here and choosing from the links.

Genealogies and Military History

Information on the genealogies/whakapapa I have compiled can be found by clicking on here.

Links to local military histories and war stories I have compiled can be found here.

Special Characters

A compilation of special characters who farmed in the valleys and hills between the Hokianga and Kaipara Harbours can be found here.

130 thoughts on ““Through the Window of Time”

  1. Kia Ora my name is Wai Hadfield, my great great Grandfather is Pene Popata he was one of 39 first nation children that attended Maropiu School, his wife is Te Awe Popata ( Rapana) known in the community as Granny Pene, they had a daughter named Susy Popata she enrolled at Maropiu in 1916, later Susy married Te Hira Erai, they all lived in Mamaranui thr first house burned and thr 2nd house was situated behind the local O’Hellorans Shop( I hope I spelled that right). Hira and Susy had 14 Children, Kiwi was thr son.

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    1. Yes I understand whakapapa can be a very sensitive issue. But nowadays in the world of Treaty claims whakapapa becomes more open to public scrutiny.
      I misunderstood your reason for sharing yours and thought you were asking for help to fill in the dots. So I am sorry for that.
      I get many email requests from my webpage to help people find their whakapapa in the Kaihu Valley and surrounds so just assumed you were asking as well.
      Anyway as far as knowing your family, well you are right the name “Erai” is not familiar to me but I did know the Hita and Pumipi whanau really well. Johny Hita was a good mate of mine. The Te Waiti family also lived at Mamaranui until their house burnt down and Mr Te Waiti was killed. Their eldest son, Tamaki or Mac, lived with me and my family for about five years after that terrible accident.
      I lived in Maropiu, and went to the Maropiu school only… I played rugby in the district for about twenty years and got on well with all of my team mate’s of which many were Maori.
      I am now seventy-five and in my retirement I have compiled over 100 whakapapa for various people. I have had over 25,000 views to my webpage with only one complaint about one whakapapa. I enjoy doing this, it is good for my heart.

      Now to your ancestral whakapapa. Meaning; do you have all of your whakapapa on both maternal and paternal side of your Maori family going back to ‘Kupe’ or if you are Ngapuhi ‘Rahiri’. That is what I meant.

      It has been nice meeting you and your whakapapa is fascinating so thanks for sharing.

      Roger Mold.

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  2. Roger, your work on the Kaihu railway, and your “paper trail” have saved me hours of work as I document several hundred photos of a family album that covers from the far north to Taumarunui. Once this is done, I’ll go back to the early editions of NZMS 1 and link to some of the excllent historical photographs you reference. Much appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

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